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Could Unlimited Vacation Be the Secret Weapon to Attracting Top Talent?

HCM
Article
03/21/2017

An unlimited vacation policy might be on your company's list of potential benefits to consider this year. According to the Society for Human Resource Management, 4% of organizations are now offering unlimited time off. That number may continue to rise, as startups and large organizations alike begin experimenting with the trend. For HR managers, the key question is whether an unlimited vacation policy is right for your business. Here's a closer look at some of the pros and cons from an employee and company perspective – and some critical factors to keep in mind.

Streamline Administration

An unlimited vacation policy can streamline administration for both companies and their employees. Companies and HR departments aren't left trying to track days and ensure that employees aren't abusing policies. For example, are your employees using sick time to take care of personal errands? At the same time, employees aren't limited by a specific number of days to take a vacation. Simplified administration may help free your staff to focus on other valuable activities.

Document and Communicate the Policy

Embracing an unlimited vacation policy requires clear communication and documentation, as a liberal interpretation of the policy might lead to employees never showing up at the office. How far in advance must employees get time off requests approved? What is the approval process? Is there a maximum number of days employees are permitted to take off in a row? What arrangements must be made – or work completed – before an employee is free to leave? Define your policy so guidelines are clear, and then put the documentation and processes in place to ensure it is enforced consistently across the board.

Embracing an unlimited vacation policy requires clear communication and documentation, as a liberal interpretation of the policy might lead to employees never showing up at the office.

Use Communication to Reduce Ambiguity for Employees

Unlimited vacation policies have pros and cons for employees. In many ways, the flexible and results-driven approach to scheduling provides more control over their own schedules. As a result, employees are likely to be delighted to embrace the idea of unlimited paid time off. However, there can sometimes be confusion around this approach. How much is too much time off, for example? What are their responsibilities to complete tasks vs. getting coverage for job duties during paid time off? When an employee has three weeks of paid time off, it's easy to know whether they've used it or not.

Understanding the Role of Regulations

Paychex HR expert Jose Martinez has offered a closer look at how regulations impact unlimited vacation time. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), employers aren't required to provide paid time off – but many do, as recruitment tools and to improve the employee experience. At the state or local level, there may be statutes or regulations which impact how employee time off is granted, paid, documented, and handled in the case of termination or separation. Expert guidance is essential for any company considering an unlimited vacation policy. Employers should consult an employment attorney or HR subject matter expert to make sure they stay in compliance with applicable laws.

For companies eager to stand out from the competition, an unlimited vacation policy can be a great strategy to attract and retain top talent. However, it's important to document your policy, communicate clearly with employees, and consult with an expert to ensure you're complying with all applicable requirements.

 

This website contains articles posted for informational and educational value. Paychex is not responsible for information contained within any of these materials. Any opinions expressed within materials are not necessarily the opinion of, or supported by, Paychex. The information in these materials should not be considered legal or accounting advice, and it should not substitute for legal, accounting, and other professional advice where the facts and circumstances warrant.
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