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How to Find the Right Candidate for Your Business

Human Resources

In today's fast-paced business world the request to have someone who can do the job you need right now is very common. Seems like a simple request and easy enough to satisfy, but let’s give it some thought.

Recruiting quality candidates that are the right fit for your company continues to be one of the biggest challenges facing many small business owners. Are employers looking for too much in one person or is the search process not being completed thoroughly?

Here is a list of some low-cost recruitment strategies that can help you find your next quality employee:

1.    Networking.

Who do you know? How do you know them? So many Americans are searching for jobs. You may know a few through neighbors, parents of your children's friends, members of groups or associations you belong to, past co-workers, high school, college, or current classmates, etc.

2.    Employee referrals.

Do you have a great employee? Maybe they know another terrific person looking for a job. As an employer you could consider an employee referral program to boost incentive.

3.    State employment office/employment commission.

This office is focused on partnering with local businesses to employ those who may currently be receiving unemployment benefits but are searching for employment. This can be a great online resource as well—most offices are connected to CareerBuilder and employers can post positions. Plus some offices offer onsite space to conduct interviews. Check with your local employment office/employment commission about their services.

4.    Onsite job fair/open house.

You can control when, where, and what steps to take to make a good hire and get it done quickly! Be sure to place an attractive notice of the open house date and time at your business entrance—choose a morning (9 a.m. to noon) or afternoon (1 p.m. to 4 p.m.). Be prepared with job descriptions, applications, and interviewing questions and you can screen at the job fair for either direct hires or setup for follow-up interviews.

5.    Online posting.

This can be done on your business website, state employment office (or employment commission) website, and other websites like Craigslist and Angie's List. In the job description, be sure to list specific qualifications and required education/experience—this can help cut down on unqualified applicant submissions.

6.    Online searching.

This will take some time as there are numerous websites you may choose to review. The hiring supervisor and/or human resources staff can perform searches by checking online for qualified and skilled candidates. These can be industry-specific or non-industry-specific websites, simple listings, or even more in-depth sites that require account setups for use. Once you have found a few good sites for your industry, make sure you bookmark them!

7.    College placement offices.

Contact the placement offices at your local community colleges and universities to submit job postings. Considering there are a lot of people returning to college, you have the possibility of finding candidates with a wide range of work experience and education.

There are additional affordable recruitment strategies at your disposal. Using the right mix can help you find your next quality employee.



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Maria Watkins, PHR, SHRM-CP, is a HR Professional with 20 plus years of experience within a variety of business industries including amusement/gaming/entertainment, medical services, and charitable organizations. She is currently an HR Consultant with Paychex, Inc., providing small- to medium-size business clients with direction and support in managing their human resources initiatives.

This website contains articles posted for informational and educational value. Paychex is not responsible for information contained within any of these materials. Any opinions expressed within materials are not necessarily the opinion of, or supported by, Paychex. The information in these materials should not be considered legal or accounting advice, and it should not substitute for legal, accounting, and other professional advice where the facts and circumstances warrant.
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