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Tips for a Terrific HR Tech Conference, with Tim Sackett and Meghan Biro

Human Resources
Article
09/07/2018

On Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, thousands of HR and IT professionals from around the world will meet in Las Vegas to research HR technology, learn the best ways to implement new systems, and stay on top of emerging trends.

If you’ll be attending Human Resource Executive’s HR Technology Conference & Exposition — “HR Tech” to regulars — get ready for a week packed with informative sessions and an expo hall full of the latest solutions.

Tips for a great HR Tech experience

For some exclusive tips on getting the most from HR Tech, we asked these HR all-stars what you should know before you go — whether it’s your first time at the conference, or your fifteenth.

Tim Sackett, SCP, SPHR, HRU-Tech.com, TimSackett.com, Fistful of Talent

Stay at the conference hotel. At HR Tech, you think you're saving money by staying down the road but then you end up spending all those savings on taxis and Ubers, plus just the travel time and hassle going back and forth.

Go down to the area around High Roller (huge Ferris Wheel in Vegas) and check out the best cupcakes on the planet at Sprinkles!

Go into the expo and stop at three vendor booths that are the small ones (the 10’ x 10’) and do the demos — you'll find super cool stuff you’ve never heard about. You’ll also find stuff that is probably super cost-effective because they're looking to make a name for themselves!

Meghan Biro, Founder and CEO, TalentCulture, HR analyst, author, and speaker

Those attending HR Tech for the first time should start with the keynote — a must. And I’m really excited about the session tracks — the HR transformation, which is all about learning to use data, predictive tech and algorithms to drive better results along the whole of the candidate and employee journey. And how to get better insights. That seems really vital to what’s happening right now. Also, the AI and Market visionaries sessions. Those look really promising. And I love being out on the floor and seeing the tremendous innovations happening.

So often we walk into these events with a pattern already established in our minds. For those who have attended HR Tech many times, how can we experience the show in a new or different way? First off, be counterintuitive. Hey men: show up for the women in HR tech programs, for instance. And the policy and big-picture people should go to the exhibitors that are offering really practical tools, and then the gear mavens to attend sessions on the big picture, like the importance of off-boarding and how AI is going to change talent management. And everyone should check out the pitch fest, where the seeds for the next big HR tech tool may be planted before our eyes. This event is a great opportunity to get outside our bubble.

You know that saying, what happens in Vegas….? Outside of the show, there are certainly a ton of great restaurants and unbeatable shows in Vegas. I love The Strip — the crazy over-the-top neon, the retro look. I’ve heard that the history downtown is really interesting, too. But the truth is, I’m going for HR Tech, and that’s where I’ll be. To learn, to network, and to really celebrate this industry and how it’s grown exponentially. That’s what we’re here for.

Plan ahead for a better conference

Paychex has been an exhibitor at HR Tech for many years, and our people have attended sessions right beside you. Here are our suggestions on how to make your HR Tech experience more enjoyable and productive.

Remember to catch the keynotes — Get advice from Randi Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Zuckerberg Media, on making technology work for you and your business, and learn important lessons from Mike Rowe, host of Discovery Channel’s Dirty Jobs, on the true nature of skilled labor.

Choose sessions before you go — Don’t miss the best sessions because you weren’t prepared. HR Tech’s 11 content tracks include dozens of sessions covering everything from project success, with best practices and strategies for addressing the HR technology product lifecycle, to the latest about artificial intelligence in HR.

Celebrate Women in HR Technology® — These sessions will help you promote gender parity and diversity in the workplace, with timely topics such as driving gender equality with analytics, how to address pay equity and financial wellness, and strategies for climbing the leadership ladder.

Attend the world’s largest HR technology expo — Learn about the latest HR technology and the companies behind the innovations from nearly 450 vendors from 17 countries. Of course, you’re welcome to visit us at booth #1115 for a personal demo of Paychex Flex®.

Remember you’re going to Vegas

No one expects you to spend 100 percent of your time at HR Tech, at HR Tech. The conference is being held in the beautiful Venetian® Las Vegas, with art installations, a gondola ride, and a recreation of Venice’s St. Mark’s Square. And as Meghan and Tim noted, The Strip is pretty over the top, with bright neon, world-class restaurants, a giant Ferris wheel, and … cupcakes … apparently. Thanks, Tim!

We hope these tips help you make the most of your time at the HR Tech Conference, and we look forward to seeing you there.

This website contains articles posted for informational and educational value. Paychex is not responsible for information contained within any of these materials. Any opinions expressed within materials are not necessarily the opinion of, or supported by, Paychex. The information in these materials should not be considered legal or accounting advice, and it should not substitute for legal, accounting, and other professional advice where the facts and circumstances warrant.
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