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Female Empowerment: Fortune 500 CEOs


Women Fortune 500 CEOs. Highlighted statistics.

While men have traditionally dominated the world of business, more women than ever are excelling as Chief Executive Officers (CEOs), the leaders of their companies. Just over 4 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs are women—most commonly for companies in the technology and food and beverage sectors.

How does education correlate with this type of success? Of these women, one-third attended an Ivy League college (Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, or Yale), and 7 in 10 hold at least a Master's degree.

Today, women preside over leading companies such as General Motors, Hewlett-Packard, PepsiCo, Inc., and Campbell Soup. While the number of female CEOs is down slightly from 2015, it's expected to grow in the latter half of 2016, when women take the helm at Occidental Petroleum and Reinsurance Group of America.

Indeed, the future looks bright for women as business leaders. Based on the rising trends of women seeking higher education and entering the workforce, as well as evolving social attitudes, many experts believe that by 2040 women will comprise as many as one-third of American CEOs.



This website contains articles posted for informational and educational value. Paychex is not responsible for information contained within any of these materials. Any opinions expressed within materials are not necessarily the opinion of, or supported by, Paychex. The information in these materials should not be considered legal or accounting advice, and it should not substitute for legal, accounting, and other professional advice where the facts and circumstances warrant.
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