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Are You Aware of the Latest Changes to Your State Minimum Wage?

Payroll
Article
05/19/2015

The minimum wage continues to be an important issue for businesses around the nation. The federal minimum wage rate remains $7.25 (effective May 12, 2015). However, many states and local municipalities have set their own minimum wage rate.

Currently, 29 states and the District of Columbia (DC) have minimum wage rates set above the federal minimum wage. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, lawmakers in Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, and DC enacted increases during the 2014 session. Meanwhile, voters in Alaska, Arkansas, Nebraska, and South Dakota approved minimum wage increases through ballot measures. Fifteen states and Washington DC index their minimum wage to increase automatically according to cost of living changes.

The 29 states with minimum wage rates above the federal minimum are: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia.

Here is a breakdown of the changes that have recently gone into effect:

Alaska: Currently $8.75. Set to rise to $9.75 effective Jan. 1, 2016; with indexed annual increases to begin Jan. 1, 2017.

Arkansas: Currently $7.50. Set to rise to $8.00 effective Jan. 1, 2016, and $8.50 effective Jan. 1, 2017.

Connecticut: Currently $9.15. Set to rise to $9.60 effective Jan. 1, 2016; set to rise to $10.10 effective Jan. 1, 2017.

Delaware: Currently $7.75. Set to rise to $8.25 effective Jun. 1, 2015.

District of Columbia: Currently $9.50. Set to rise to $10.50 effective July 1, 2015, and $11.50 on July 1, 2016.

Hawaii: Currently $7.75. Set to rise to $8.50 on Jan. 1, 2016; $9.25 on Jan. 1, 2017; and $10.10 on Jan. 1, 2019.

Maryland: Currently $8.00. Set to rise to $8.25 on July 1, 2015; $8.75 on July 1, 2016; $9.25 on July 1, 2017; and $10.10 on July 1, 2018.

Massachusetts: Currently $9.00. Set to rise to $10.00 on Jan. 1, 2016, and $11 on Jan. 1, 2017.

Michigan: Currently $8.15. Set to rise to $8.50 effective Jan. 1, 2016; $8.90 on Jan. 1, 2017; $9.25 on Jan. 1, 2018. Annual increases are indexed to CPI as of Jan. 1, 2019, not to exceed 3.5 percent annually.

Minnesota: Currently $6.50 for small employers (those with annual receipts of less than $500,000). Set to rise to $7.25 effective Aug. 1, 2015, and $7.75 effective Aug. 1, 2016.  Currently $8.00 for large employers (those with annual receipts of $500,000 or more). Set to rise to $9.00 effective Aug. 1, 2015, and $9.50 effective Aug. 1, 2016. 

Nebraska: Currently $8.00. Set to rise to $9.00 effective Jan. 1, 2016.

Rhode Island: Raised to the current level of $9.00.

South Dakota: Currently $8.50. Annual indexed increases to begin Jan. 1, 2016.

Vermont: Currently $9.15. Set to rise as follows: $9.60 on Jan. 1, 2016; $10.00 on Jan. 1, 2017; $10.50 on Jan. 1, 2018. On Jan. 1, 2019, the minimum wage will increase by CPI or 5 percent, whichever is smaller.

West Virginia: Currently $8.00. Set to rise to $8.75 effective Dec. 31, 2015.

This website contains articles posted for informational and educational value. Paychex is not responsible for information contained within any of these materials. Any opinions expressed within materials are not necessarily the opinion of, or supported by, Paychex. The information in these materials should not be considered legal or accounting advice, and it should not substitute for legal, accounting, and other professional advice where the facts and circumstances warrant.
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